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Thread: (b13) Is There a way to create this?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
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    Default (b13) Is There a way to create this?

    Hi,
    I'm a Jazz player and want to know if there is a way to enter a chord like a Bb(b13) etc.?
    Thanks
    Gerry

  2. #2

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    Quote Originally Posted by Viola View Post
    Hi,
    I'm a Jazz player and want to know if there is a way to enter a chord like a Bb(b13) etc.?
    Thanks
    Gerry
    The attached example has some options that are recognized by the player
    b7b13, 9#5, 7#5, +, and a slash-chord inversion with the b13 on the bottom

    b13 - Example

    Give 'em a listen and see if one will work for you.
    You can write the chord Bb(b13) if that's what you want a musician to read. (Player feature won't work)
    You could also write a chord the player will accept and add b13 USING TEXT (abc),
    That won't affect the player (won't confuse it either)
    )BOB
    Last edited by pdxdjazz; 07-31-2016 at 12:46 AM.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
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    828

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    When I see a Bb(b13) in a chart, I would assume (as most players would) that it includes both perfect 5th and minor 6th (or 13th), which is kind of unusual sounding chord.
    If you meant a major triad where the minor 6th replaces the perfect 5th, then it's just an augmented chord (1, 3, #5) that is available in iReal chord library (noted with the symbol "+")

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
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    Cyrille, I think that often the plain b13 chords printed in fake books are really augmented chords; the fake book editor wants to suggest an inner line. For example, using Bb7, the editor wants to suggest an inner line (or reflect the melody line) of G, Gb, and F. A well-known example is Jobim's "Wave" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a6KDpB6skA4. In measures 7 and 8, the chord progression is F#13, F#+, B9, indicating a chord progression in which the high note of each chord is D#, D, and C#. To me, a true b13 chord is a polychord. A Bb7 chord with a b13 would be voiced (for a pianist playing with a bassist) with a D and Ab in the left hand an a Gb triad in the right hand, containing the #9 and b13 and would often be marked as Bb7alt.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
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    Yes, I agree with what you say.
    But I think the original post mention about a Bb(b13), without a 7th, so that's something else since it's not dominant chord. Unless it's a typing mistake.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by Keith88 View Post
    Cyrille, I think that often the plain b13 chords printed in fake books are really augmented chords; the fake book editor wants to suggest an inner line. For example, using Bb7, the editor wants to suggest an inner line (or reflect the melody line) of G, Gb, and F. A well-known example is Jobim's "Wave" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a6KDpB6skA4. In measures 7 and 8, the chord progression is F#13, F#+, B9, indicating a chord progression in which the high note of each chord is D#, D, and C#. To me, a true b13 chord is a polychord. A Bb7 chord with a b13 would be voiced (for a pianist playing with a bassist) with a D and Ab in the left hand an a Gb triad in the right hand, containing the #9 and b13 and would often be marked as Bb7alt.
    Yup, half-step intervals in polychords generally sound better when the dissonant elements are widely separated.

    )BOB
    Last edited by pdxdjazz; 08-09-2016 at 01:53 PM.

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