Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: Mystery Note Eb Sax

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Posts
    4

    Default Mystery Note Eb Sax

    Hola

    New member here... Malko Eb sax wonderful 1960 Martin just had it reworked and it sounds great. Have not played much in the last few years and than mostly by ear. I am now learning to read. So working on a new tune and found a note that I can not find a name for. LH 123 RH 23. I have added a attachment of the fingering as well of the note. Thanks much for any help on this one. Looking forward to a long time of info going forward.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

Name:	UNKNOWN.png 
Views:	59 
Size:	15.3 KB 
ID:	371  
    Last edited by pdxdjazz; 10-14-2015 at 10:59 PM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    1,842

    Default

    You say RH23 but doesn't the diagram show RH13?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Posts
    4

    Default

    OOPs you are right fat fingers! The attachment is correct. RH 13 thanks

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    1,842

    Default

    As you are a beginner re-learning the notes, it would probably be a bad sounding F (alto/baritone sax F, concert Ab). If you finger the F as normal (LH123 RH1) then simply press the RH3 down so it is fingered as you are asking, you should hear it sound more muffled. Do you? It is not a standard fingering. (A jazz player might use it as an effect, as sometimes they toggle between two fingerings of the same note so the texture changes, but for now, I would not recommend it as you want to develop clarity in your sound with the correct fingering).

    The only other thing I can think of is that one of my clarinets is slightly strange, I can do that fingering (sometimes it is called 'forked') and because of the extra key levers, it is actually a legitimate fingering for this particular instrument (and others made in the same way). Some (vintage, so it could be yours...) saxophones had this also but it would be rare I would think and I have never seen one. If you do have this on yours, it should generate a clear sound a whole step lower than the F—an Eb. Finger a normal Eb then do this fingering and see if you get a clear Eb sound as well. It might sound very slightly different in texture, but should be very near the normal Eb in sound. If you have a friend with a sax you can look at the levers and rods around RH 2 (I presume) and see if there is a difference. (Again, I have not actually seen one to know what to look for, but if you have this, it would presumably be different than a normal sax) and the repairer who serviced your instrument would remember if it has this.

    One more thing, very advanced players use different finger and lever combinations to play very high above the normal range of the standard fingered notes (altissimo) but I am not aware of this combination of fingers being used in that way (someone at the forum here might jump in and comment further on this) but I am assuming for your question, it is irrelevant.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Posts
    4

    Default

    Thanks much for the info. Great info, and yes you are right, I hear the difference now. The E# / F is the right note in that line. Do not know why I did not see (hear) it before. Again a BIG THANKS MUCH for pointing me in the right direction.
    M

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    1,842

    Default

    if you are getting used to blowing again you might have been making an unclear, weak F anyway, so having RH3 down also, might not have made much difference initially for you to be aware of.
    (You probably know, practicing playing just one note and holding it steady as a long held note is extremely beneficial for your diaphragm/lungs, air stream, ear acuity, lip tension, sound, timbre, pitch, clarity, volume practice, stamina and so on. Listen to the nature of the sound of the note you are producing and you will become aware of different fluctuations in some of these as you play it.)

    Best wishes for your playing and practicing.
    (Remember to set global transpose to Eb instrument, information in the tutorials)

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Posts
    4

    Default

    Again thanks for the pointers. No problem with the diaphragm, been blowin' harp since the mid 60s. Cut my teeth with B B King producing my early recordings in the 70's. But need guidance on sax after a long time away.
    M

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Do you have any questions?

Check out our Support page

Sign up to our newsletter
Join us